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Mathematical Psychology Newman Universal Tempo Scale Offered To World Psychology The Speed Of Resurrection Timing

Kanye West: Contemporary Socrates, Plato or Reagan with the Benefit of History?

When I heard this track on the day it was released, I thought to myself: there is much more to this man than just being a [colored man] from Chicago with a nice flow.

Purple-Rain-Prince-modern-harmonic-tempo-map
Purple-Rain-Prince-modern-harmonic-tempo-map

When I was a child on Chicago many restaurants were open at lunch and had bands like you hear about he Beatles in Hamburg now.   That, but simple lunch.  I remember strolling around Chicago at 4-6 years old, with all the bad memories cut out (our memories are so pink sometimes – well, mine are), and the songs in my time, in my parents’ library was essentially – Bach, Beethoven,

 

 

Beatles, Bacharach, Debussy, Ravel – as my dad was an eye surgeon [in training] at Northwestern University and the aforementioned composers set me on a path of [Pat Metheny / Lyle Mays] addiction and the conviction that with no way to explain this to myself – and this is true not only for a high percentage of not only musicians and non-musicians,  that there were certain still un-copyrightable [grove patterns]. That said, if any of us make it to heaven you know Bo Diddley is going to be there. Can you image if could have copyrighted the foundation of 1/2 of pop music?

Bo DiddleyIn that light, I think Kanye can pick up the Bo Diddly torch and with reason and mercy and ease over whining and having reason bypassed straight to slogans where Socrates would even say: I thought this would have stopped by now, by good for Mr. West.

Kanye-West-Dark_Fantasy-median-expected-matherton-tempo-diagram copy

 

Rudy Kirgurg, with feedback from Nicholas Ascenscion

 

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Mathematical Psychology Newman Universal Tempo Scale Offered To World Psychology The Speed Of Melodrama Timing

“Suzanne” by Leonard Cohen, performed by Judy Collins | 5 unclassified matherton diagrams w video embedded

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Mathematical Psychology Psychology The Speed Of Desire Timing

The Speed Of Desire – Dave Matthews Band – Declassified tempo maps “#41” part two

According to Dave Matthews’ introduction of this song from a version recorded with Tim Reynolds at Luther College, “#41” was the “Forty-first single that was recorded by the Dave Matthews Band.” He went on to mock himself, “about as creative as the Dave Matthews band,” but went on to record one of the best versions of the many DMB is smart enough to sell from many venues – so that his band and their families and the roadies and techs and suits, they get their share. Dave and his band got into music at about he final time that music was centralized enough for one voice to be heard.

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Mathematical Psychology Newman Universal Tempo Scale Offered To World Psychology The Speed Of Enthusiasm Timing Uncertainty and Music

Follow You, Follow Me | Genesis, Peter Gabriel, Gordon Lightfoot and the Wreck Of The Edmund Fitzgerald Idea.

Follow You, Follow Me is a song Genesis wrote for their album AND THEN THERE WERE THREE.  The reason for the title was that The Five member band had lost Peter Gabriel, who, uh, did pretty well on his own – in 1974.  Peter’s family had an illness within and he had no moral choice but to leave the band. In Nicholas Nassim Taleb’s construction of a Black Swan event, Peter Gabriel’s solo career, beginning from the new sound that *popped* out of his first albums, and Peter’s creativity shows no sign of waning.

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Both Gabriels’s and Genesis’ career [American grammar] along with Phil Collins’ career meet the theory I made up with no authority at all.  It is called the The Edmund Fitzgerald rule (“TWOTEFR”). The surviving families of the Edmund Fitzgerald honored Mr. Lightfoot by asking him personally to write a song commemorating the twenty-nine lives that were lost on the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald.

Father-Christmas-Emerson-Lake-And-Palmer-median-speed-tempo-diagram
Father-Christmas-Emerson-Lake-And-Palmer-median-speed-tempo-diagram

I have never met Gordon en persona, yet musically, I was lucky enough to hear the song in my wife’s hometown of Philadelphia.  Dr. Lightfoot played the same 12 string throughout most of his show, including TWOTEFR.  My inductive hypothesis that might be garbage  That song, in my opinion could ONLY have been written by Mr Lightfoot. I had to be (or not, I am a huge  Nassim Nicholas Taleb reader, and I know I’m on thin ice here).

Gordon’s monologue continues, “I was flattered when they came to me and asked me to write an elegy like about the incident. When I first played it, I had no idea how they react.  I was as nervous as I’d ever been but I can say that their appreciation is something that nothing in my career could ever surpass.  I am always honored to play this song.”

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takin-it-to-the-streets-the-doobie-brothers–seven-four-six-img

The Gordon Lightfoot Rule needs a quick example:  after a show in the 1980s Bob Dylan is known to have said something that is key example of TWOTEF rule – “[Sometimes after a show I think about having played a song as Like A Rolling Stone, and I say this not to brag, it just is. I think: did I actually write that song?” Meaning, simply, again, a song that the Black Swan Axiom notwithstanding, had to be. So it is not a rule as a law – it is an opinion in artistic taste. We are most careful here! I know you are if you have read this far.

A lot of women would say at Genesis concerts: “Follow You You, Follow Me” is my favorite song by this band. Men liked it because in the days that we Genesis fans brought girls to shows in the 1970s-2007, because if the women were actually happy at a show.

 

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